Brilliant dad feature week 14

This weeks Brilliant Dad Feature is Bryan who blogs at Triple The Dad. He’s a dad of triplets.from the USA.

Thanks very much for taking part.

1. Have you always wanted to be a dad?

No.
In fact, when I was a teen I was pretty set on not having kids at
all. I’m a relatively solitary person and somewhat of an introvert.
To function properly I need down time to myself to recharge. I knew
even as a teen that having children would mess with that
As I
aged I came around to having kids and by the time we decided to have
kids it was pretty much my idea. But those same worries have been a
struggle – sometimes daily – and have been amplified by having
triplets. But it has been a blast and I wouldn’t have done it any
other way

2. How
did you feel when your children were born?

Ecstatic.
Exhausted. It was a little like finishing a race, only to know you
had to start an entire new race right away.

My
wife spent 12 weeks on bed rest, 9 of which were in the hospital. She
went in at 26 weeks and we got the entire “if you have kids at 26
weeks, these are the potential complications and these are the likely
outcomes.” So the entire 9 weeks was not only us being separated
and me visiting her every day, but a battle to keep those kids
cooking. Every phone call I got had me wondering if this was the
moment. Which I guess isn’t all that different than most dads
experiences, except that at 27, 28, 29 weeks, the stakes are that much
higher.


3. What have been the most rewarding experiences been so far?
Watching
them grow, I suppose. I love when they learn that new skill. You see
the pride in their eyes and your heart just glows.

4. What are some of funniest moments to have happened to you as a dad?

Funny
and frustrating: The early trips to Target, where we would be stopped
every five minutes with questions like “are they natural?” “are
those triplets?”

My
favourite: “are they identical?” to which we would answer “no.”
Sometimes we would get “are you sure?” Which was funny because we
have 2 boys and a girl. Yeah, one of them CLEARLY isn’t identical.

Taking
the kids for a walk was funny, because as we went down the sidewalk
in our triplet stroller we could watch all the heads snap around as
the drivers tried to figure out exactly what was going on!

5. Have there been any situations with your children that you found
difficult to cope with?

Is
listing pretty much any struggle too much of a cop out?

Early
on, our kids were in NICU, which was tough and because they were
premature they struggled with some strength developments like tummy
time and sitting and the like. Having three kids whose
every-three-hour feedings take 1.5 hours themselves while trying to
sort out if your kids are hitting developmental marks and what to do
about it if they 
aren’t was trying. Looking back, I’m almost not sure how we did it!

We
have one who is a bit on the socially anxious side, and its been
tough to see him struggle with that. 

I remember some of those
same emotions from my own youth. But its also the fact that, everyone
learns the alphabet and counting and the like. There are very few
adults who can’t do those things. But I know plenty of emotionally
damaged adults and people who struggle in social circles, and it can
be a real detriment to a full life.

6. What are your dreams and hopes for your children?

More
than anything, I hope they are healthy and happy adults.Whether that
means they are CEOs, or work at nonprofits, or Burger King, I hope
they appreciate what they have, who they are, and are happy. You can
have a million dollars and if you are miserable it won’t mean a
lick. But if you have your health and are happy, well, you are
already a step ahead in life.

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